Wednesday, February 18 – Pedagogies

Reading

A Guide to Composition Pedagogies, pp. 212-316

Required

  • Researched Writing
  • Rhetoric and Argumentation
  • Second Language Learning
  • Writing in the Disciplines
  • Writing Center

To learn more

  • Process

Writing

  • Live tweet one reading
  • Blog post: Proposed area of inquiry. Ultimately, your curiosity about a particular question will inform your two contributions to our shared annotated bibliography. These contributions might help you more clearly form a question about writing or suggest how you might go about answering a question you’ve already developed. You will also propose a student related to your question in which you apply one or more of the methods we consider in upcoming sessions. In this post, then, forward a provisional question, explain why you’re curious about this area, and tell us how you came to this interest through your work in our course or work you’ve undertaken elsewhere.

Planning

Review the syllabus checklist and Emory FYC Outcomes. Begin sketching an assignment sequence that will culminate in a product that is not a traditional essay or that employs multiple genres as writing-to-learn or writing-to-prepare activities.

Wednesday, February 11 – Pedagogies

Reading

A Guide to Composition Pedagogies, pp. 111-211

Leaders: Read the chapter for which you signed up, a source mentioned in the chapter, and two other chapters.

Others: Read four chapters.

  • Feminist
  • Genre
  • Literature and Composition
  • New Media
  • Online and Hybrid

General course descriptions for ENG 101 and CPLT 110.

Writing

  • Live tweet one reading
  • Prepare to lead discussion: As part of your discussion, take us through one of the sources mentioned in your chapter as a way to help us form a more detailed understanding of this pedagogy. Tell us also what steps you might take to implement this kind of pedagogy in a first-year class.
  • Blog post: ENG 101 or CPLT 110 course description: These descriptions generally identify a theme or line of intellectual inquiry for the course, foreground the kinds of writing students will do in the class and, in some cases, forward the key texts students will read. Note that in all first-year composition courses, student writing produced in the course comprises the most important course text. Your description should be at most two (or three if very short) paragraphs long and should be written with an eye to attracting first-semester, first-year students. You can look at descriptions appearing in the syllabi of previous cohorts. I’m including three examples below.

Example 1, ENG 101

Image, Ambiguity, Argument

 

English 101 is a sequence of readings, discussions, exercises, drafts, conferences, revisions, peer notes, workshops, secondary revisions, and reflections designed to help you to make progress as a thinker and writer and thus to prepare yourself for your future in the university and beyond. In English 101 you will investigate and grapple with fundamental challenges faced by writers across the academic disciplines.

 

In this particular section of English 101 you will pay close attention to, infer from, and write about images—mainly paintings, photographs, and photographic essays—though written texts will be read and discussed in detail, and will be used as lenses on visual materials. Do not mistake this section for a course in which you will do less reading than in other sections.

Example 2, CPLT 110

Literary Darwinism

 

This class will be a writing-intensive introduction to Literary Darwinism. Why do we write novels, poetry, make films? Why do we read them? Why do we go to the cinema? Why have human beings adapted to enjoy and pursue literary and cinematic texts? These questions, Literary Darwinists assert, can be answered through an evolutionary lens. Applying a biological concept to ‘humanities’ subjects engages students in an interdisciplinary mode of study, and strengthens their understanding of and proficiency in writing – specifically, in writing about writing and reading (and film making and watching). We will compose multimodal texts, including collaborative tasks and digital media presentations, as well as response papers and an argumentative essay in which you use evidence to support a claim. By the end of the course, you will have gained valuable tools in both writing and digital fluency, as well as having acquired knowledge of an increasingly important academic/literary field.

Example 3, ENG 101

Composition and Comics

POW! ZAP! You just thought of Batman, didn’t you? It’s practically impossible to read those words without thinking of the combination of text and images the old Adam West show employed so effectively, which is precisely the kind of multimodal composition this class will explore and create.

 

This class will engage critical thinking and reading skills through the discussion, analysis, and production of the ultimate in multi-modal texts — comics. We’ll read an array of comics, including superheroes, web comics, and comics journalism, to learn more about how these texts seamlessly integrate words, image, and design to create narrative and argument. You will develop composition skills through rhetorical analysis and the creation of your own comics, and will ultimately draw on those skills to compose a multimodal argument hosted on your own website.

 

This course is designed to reflect the changing nature of composition, recognizing that writing is often only one mode among many used to form and communicate our ideas. This class will help you learn skills to compose effectively in multiple modes and in web-based media, which will serve you well no matter your future field.

Planning

Continue thinking about

  • A subject for your contribution to the video lexicon.
  • A line of inquiry you’d like to pursue for the annotated bibliography entries and (modest) study proposal you’ll produce.

Wednesday, February 4 – Pedagogies

Writing Program Speakers Series

Cheryl Ball: Bio and Schedule
Thursday and Friday, February 5 and 6

Reading

A Guide to Composition Pedagogies, pp. 1-110

Leaders: Read the introduction, the chapter for which you signed up, a source mentioned in the chapter, and one other chapter.

Others: Read the introduction and three other chapters.

  • What is Composition Pedagogy? (All)
  • Basic Writing
  • Collaborative Writing
  • Community-Engaged
  • Critical
  • Cultural Studies
  • Expressive

Writing

  • Live tweet one reading
  • Prepare to lead discussion: As part of your discussion, take us through one of the sources mentioned in your chapter as a way to help us form a more detailed understanding of this pedagogy. Tell us also what steps you might take to implement this kind of pedagogy in a first-year class.
  • Complete CITI training. NB: You only need to complete the following. Don’t worry about the Social Sciences Module.

    • Curriculum Group: Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR)
    • Course Learner Group: Human Subject Research Track (RCR)
    • Stage: Stage 1 – Basic Course

Planning

Continue thinking about

  • A description for your ENG 101 or CPLT 110 course (due as blog post next week). These descriptions generally identify a theme or line of intellectual inquiry for the course, foreground the kinds of writing students will do in the class and, in some cases, forward the key texts students will read. Note that in all first-year composition courses, student writing produced in the course comprises the most important course text. Your description should be at most two paragraphs long (one is preferable), and should be written with an eye to attracting first-semester, first-year students. Try to avoid having your description sound like a dissertation abstract.
  • A subject for your contribution to the video lexicon.
  • A line of inquiry you’d like to pursue for the annotated bibliography entries and (modest) study proposal you’ll produce.

Wednesday, January 28 – Social Turn and Post Process

Reading

Required

Writing/Making

  • Live tweet one reading
  • Prepare to lead discussion
  • Continue working on CITI certification

Planning

Begin thinking about

  • A description for your ENG 101 or CPLT 110 course. These descriptions generally identify a theme or line of intellectual inquiry for the course, foreground the kinds of writing students will do in the class and in some cases forward the key texts students will read. Note that in all first-year composition courses, student writing produced in the course comprises the most important course text. Your description should be at most two paragraphs long (one is preferable), and should be written with an eye to attracting first-semester, first-year students. Try to avoid having your description sound like a dissertation abstract.
  • A subject for your contribution to the video lexicon.
  • A line of inquiry you’d like to pursue for the annotated bibliography entries and (modest) study proposal you’ll produce.

Wednesday, January 21 – Situation and Process

Reading

Required

To Learn More

Writing/Making

• Curriculum Group: Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR)
• Course Learner Group: Human Subject Research Track (RCR)
• Stage: Stage 1 – Basic Coure

Establish your domain

  • Start at http://emorydomains.org. (For help, see Getting Started.) Use the coupon code I gave you in class to “pay” for your domain.
  • Install WordPress. (For help, see screencast.)
  • Choose a new theme to install on your site and activate it. (For help, see WordPress themes documentation.)
  • Set up a Gravatar associated with your Emory email address.
  • Create an “About” page and make that the landing page for your site. On that page write a brief paragraph or two that discusses what you’re studying and anything else you’d like to share with the world. (For help, see screencast.)
  • Include image of yourself or some representation of yourself on the “About” page. This image should be the same one you used when you set up your Gravatar. (For help, see WordPress images documentation.)
  • Email me (d dot d dot fisher at emory dot edu) the URL to your WordPress site.

 

Wednesday, January 14 – History

Reading

In Class

Timeline development

Represent what your group views as one important strand in the development of rhetoric and composition studies by creating timeline that can be shared via the web:

  1. Find a free tool that will enable you to show the development of the thread by representing both events and time spans.
  2. Include at least five points and one span on your timeline. These need to be developed with a brief description of the event and what you see as its significance. You should also include a creative-commons licensed photo for each point/span.
  3. Develop a simple claim (thesis) about the ensemble of points and spans you’ve included. This claim will serve as the caption for the timeline when you link to it or embed it in a webpage.

Lexicon Development

  1. What is current-traditional rhetoric? Describe its relationship to New Criticism.
  2. Characterize the differences between a “Harvard-model” writing course and a “Dartmouth-model” writing course.
  3. Explain how the idea of “discourse community” helped compositionists explain the way writers structure meaning. What literary critic inspired this formulation and how did his thinking evolve through the 1970s and 1980s?
  4. What role did Chomsky and the Cambridge revolution play in the evolution of writing studies?
  5. How did Austin, Grice, and especially Searle signal a “counter revolution,” again, specifically in terms of writing studies?
  6. What kind of writing studies research programs/agendas do you think the ascendance of dialogism and functionalism might suggest?
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